The question "What makes us human?" is so fundamental. In this short essay response to Frankenstein that I wrote for my Brit Lit II survey, I examine whether or not the "creature" is a human being. To do so, we have to think about what exactly the criteria for humanity is. Read on for short exploration of the topic:

Despite his hideous appearance, Viktor Frankenstein's creation isn't actually a monster, it is really a human being. We can see his human qualities shine through primarily in his complex emotions and his reasoning.

I recently wrote about the best way to deal with personal attacks and insults, and we also write about philosophy and reasoning here on Cranial Collision on a pretty regular basis.

So what happens when poor reasoning skills and a bad response collide in the real world?

To answer that question, click over to my mountain bike blog and read about a confrontation I had with a redneck on my second-ever road bike ride. 

If you have time, be sure to read the comments too, as there have been a lot of excellent replies. And if you have any thoughts you want to share, please feel free to chime in!
Originally written in 2008.

I believe that there is incredible proof beyond a reasonable doubt for the fact that Jesus Christ claimed He is God, that He truly is God, and that He rose from the dead. Like the reliability of the New Testament documents, the entirety of the Christian faith relies on this point. But don’t take my word for it, read on and look at the evidence.

Many people, denominations, and cults fail to fully understand the Biblical concept of the trinitarian nature of God. Generally, these people swing too far to one side or the other. They either think that God is just one person with many different characteristics, or that the Father, Son, and the Holy Spirit are completely independent of each other. Both of these views are inaccurate.

If we read the Bible and take what we read seriously, we must not fall into either one of these extremes. Rather, we must try to remain "at the center of Biblical tension."

As Wayne Grudem put it so simply in his Systematic Theology:

2. Each person is fully God.

By definition, this is a paradox. It is illogical. If something is illogical, isn't it, by definition, false? So how can this be true?

I initially wrote the following essay for a "letter to the editor" assignment in my creative nonfiction composition class. It's in response to an article published in the Atlanta Journal Constitution about the reduction in Georgia's HOPE scholarship. I don't enjoy getting this political, as naturally anything you try to write is stricken with controversy. But for this assignment, I didn't have much of a choice.

Protesters at the Capital
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Dear Editor,

I am writing in response to the article “Less HOPE becomes a fact” published in the March 11th issue of your newspaper, as well as most of the other letters that have been sent in on the same issue since that time. While your article did try to present both sides of the issue, I got the impression that you think there are many more negative aspects to this change than there are positives. At least, the vast majority of the Georgians that have since voiced their opinions on the changes are saying exactly that.

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No one is perfect, and that includes the Church. Sometimes it is important to take the time to look at what we are doing wrong, and what we can do better... even if it hurts.

From what I've observed, there are two major problems that I see in the Church today, and I'm not sure which one of them is more detrimental to the progression of Christ's Kingdom.

They are:

Many people, denominations, and other organizations fail to fully understand the Biblical concept of the Trinitarian nature of God. Generally, these people swing too far to one side or the other. They either think that God is just one person with many different characteristics, or that the Father, Son, and the Holy Spirit are completely independent of each other. Both of these views are inaccurate.

If we read the Bible and take what we read seriously, we must not fall on either one of these extremes. Rather, we must try to remain at "the center of Biblical tension."

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As part of our company, we run a contract mowing and lawn care service (for lack of a better title).  Several township and church cemeteries have been contracted to us this year and now exist as part of our weekly mowing routes.  Lately, I have spent a significant amount of time each week mowing and trimming these particular cemeteries and gravesites.

Throughout this time, I have had many opportunities to think about people's lives and the path that took them to those very graves that I weed-whack the grass on every week.  On one distinct occasion, I remember seeing a Super Bowl XLV plaque leaned up against a gravestone declaring that the Green Bay Packers are the new world champions.  Usually when something like this is displayed, it is among various other items.  But in this instance - A Packer XLV championship plaque was the only thing that had been placed by the gravestone.  
Buying Beer
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A couple of weeks ago I rhetorically asked "Why Can't I Buy Beer on Sunday?" as a way to transition into a commentary on how these sorts of laws make Christianity look to those who aren't Christians. In the course of our discussion on the topic, several of you shared from your deep stores of knowledge and informed me of some of the historic reasons behind these laws. I thought I would take the time to pass on this enlightenment to everyone else.